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television] tavis: a few programming notes. tomorrow night, a conversation with geoffrey canada and david guggenheim. then later in the week, james ellroy, and robert reich would join us with seal. we also will have nancy brinker. tonight, we kick off the week with harold for junior. the former tennessee congressman is now the chairman of the democratic leadership council, dlc, and and he has a new book, "more davids than goliaths." >> everyone should see that. what guggenheim and canada have done, it is inspiring. i hope people see it. >> it is a moving film. one thing i am sure that geoffrey and davis and i i am sure will talk about is that it is anti-union. what do you make of that? >> whether we are finding greater success in one model or the other. i think probably one of the most poignant thing that has been said is it seems our education system that of to benefit adults where it should be squarely and comprehensively how to fix kid'' problems and how to answer the challenges they faced a today, so i love the debates. i am a charter school guy. i am not an anti-union guy. geoffrey,
tavis: good evening. from los angeles, i am tavis smiley. geoffrey canada is the president and ceo of the harlem children's zone and he is the center of a new project. the sellout -- the film is a look at education in 20th- century america. the film is now open in select cities. "waiting for superman" is coming up right now. >> all i know is his name is james and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference, you help us all a better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. nationwide insurance is on your side. >> and by contributions from their pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: geoffrey canada is the ceo of the harlem tilden's zone. he is at the center of a wonderful new project from davis guggenheim called "waiting for superman." the film is a look at the state of public education in this country. >> one of the saddest days of my life was when my mother told me superman did not exist. i was a comic book readers. i read comic books. i love them. even in the death of the ghetto, you just thought -- in the d
to have huge depolts of oil and gas, and russia and canada both say it is thirst. here is our report. >> global climate change is transforming the arctic. the polarized caps shrinking as temperatures rise. already, energy companies are moving in, sensing a massive opportunity as the area opens up for commercial exploitation. it is thought the arctic region may contain vast reserves of oil and gas, and that is leading to growing competition between the countries which surround it. today, the foreign ministers of russia and canada discussed their competing claims to take control of a large part of the arctic, including the north pole. their claims will eventually be judged by international experts. >> both russia and canada respect the united nations as well as the u.n. convention on the law of the southeast, and we will submit our data on the ridge, and we are confident that our case will prevail, backed by scientific evidence. >> but the russians are already concerned that nato military forces could be sent to the arctic to protect western interests. >> we don't see, frankly speaking
. we are miles off of the western shore of canada's hudson bay, an area very inaccessible. there are no roads, but there are people who live along that shore. an enormous barge is carrying construction materials. it is the only way of getting that equipment there as part of a vital supply line. the conditions were fine, but this journey may not have been possible. as the earth warms up and polar ice melts, shipping lanes are becoming accessible for a longer in the year and for bigger vessels. that could mean the north west -- for longer in the year and for bigger vessels. this means the northwest could become an important shipping route, which could be streamy valuable. -- could be extremely valuable. the military health and exercise in arctic waters, a show of strength, and the government has committed to investing more in ships to patrol the area. other countries' dispute what canada is saying. they say the northwest passage should be free to shipping. there are some disagreements. it has a sense of the gold rush about it. remote areas like this are coming under scrutiny
the economy and create jobs. what does he need to do? >> i say emulate canada. canada has cut its government spending. its corporate tax rate is now down to 18%. ours is 35%. by the way, canada shrunk the size of its government, and it has an 8. unemployment rate, and we have 9.5. they're winning. >> susie: you would like to see some movement on taxes. >> absolutely. >> susie: we're going to have to leave it there, brian. thanks a lot. have a great weekend. >> you, too, susie. >> susie: we've been speak with brian wesburg, chief economist. >> tom: september is a good month to remember, so far. let's get to tonight's "market focus." the major indices have been climbing since the month began on wednesday, closing close to three-week highs. the dow gained almost 3% this week, with buying continuing since the big rally wednesday. the nasdaq was up 3.7% over the past five sessions, and the s&p 500 added 3.8% this week, ending with the best three-day rally since may. stocks today were able to build on the buying, with financial stocks leading the way. the financial select e.t.f. cludes banks, insu
of the commonwealth games canada. he said there are a number of issues to be addressed. >> we have to be assured by our staff we are not compromising the safety or adequacy of the accommodations for our team. we are monitoring that on a day- by-day basis. we have delayed the initial departure of the first members of our team. we are pleased with the some progress our staff has made in delhi in terms of overseeing the preparation of the apartments, but this remains a day to day process. we are being diligent in monitoring what is happening there. >> what improvements are being made on the ground? >> our staff reported that today a number of units have been brought up to standard , so we do have some rooms that will be available. we are optimistic progress is being made, but is incomprehensible the officials despite months of warning have been so indifferent for the need of the effectiveness in terms of preparing these facilities. this seems to border on the intransitive. we will not put our athletes in anything less than proper circumstances, despite the fact that the commonwealth games are a can
the company's imports from canada. the pipeline is a primary supplier of crude oil from western united states into the canada. they expect "significant impact" on oil producers and refiners. it rose 3% to $76.45 a barrel in new york trading. >> tom: politics can make investors nervous, but not tonight's "market monitor." robert drach is the publisher of the "drach weekly research report." and he's is back with here on "nightly business report." >> good to see you, tom. >> tom: ahead of the november elections, you say you're absolutely bullish about stocks. why is that? >> if there was any time you didn't have to worry about the market than elections, this is it. historically, if the legislative and executive branches offset, which looks like is going to happen. >> tom: different parties. >> yeah. they offset, it is invariably strong for stocks. one group with a lot of the political cronyism, and special if you have another things. >> tom: like what? >> the most accommodated fed in history, and the cash reserves are the largest in history. >> tom: in terms of the corporate cash -- >> right. yo
of daniel or donald. they have an accent over the o. i was born in canada, but we went back to ireland and got green cards and came here. my sister siobahn plays my schizophrenic sister on the show. tavis: it is a family show. >> it was interesting for me because i take acting seriously but do not like to talk about it that way. i do not like to look indulgent. i have my thing i do, but do not prince around and talk about it much. the first time doing things with my sister -- i was so overcome with emotion i could not -- i could not get to scenes. this is kind of a thrilling thing when you are taken by something. it is artifice. you know how the scene starts and ends. when people always say, "i do not know where i went. it is so real," it is real in that it provoked a response when you watched it, but you knew where you were going. it was thrilling because there were moments where we really felt like we were flying, in a way. hopefully, if that resonated with us that way, all you can hope is people feel the same way when they watch it. tavis: apparently, they will. the critics like it.
. and if it is september, it must be toronto, a hollywood a-lister heading to canada for the international film festival. >>> welcome to "bbc world news," broadcasting in the u.k. and around the world. the american pastor who drew international condemnation for planning to burn the car ran up on the anniversary of 9/11 has arrived in new york, where he is expected to meet the iman behind plans for a controversy a mosque near ground zero. pastor terry jones says it may still happen. >> the president was forced to spend a fair bit of a rare news conference making appeals for tolerance, saying that muslims were neighbors and friends. he can hardly not respond to the threats. the trouble is it looks like he is giving more publicity to a group that is on the fringe. pastor jones is the leader of a florida church with a congregation of about 50 people. he believes that islam is the work of the devil and he has turned to put 200 korans onto a bonfire, having the world dance to his tune. first, he said he would meet with the leaders of the ground zero mosque. now it appears that is not happening. >> we have not
in one of his campaigns, from new hampshire to canada. that really resonated with me. it was a touching, motivating story. there is one by a brain surgeon. he was in emigrant migrant worker, who came over from mexico, and he was a boxer. he really started, not even speaking english, pulling weeds. 10 years later, he was in medical school. if you could imagine that. his message was never quit, and how going from failure to failure is sometimes part of success. i really enjoyed that. interesting way of looking at it, but sometimes you don't always get where you want to go, but it does not mean you are not getting their. -- getting there. tavis: how has your relationship with your father -- when you came on the scene, we got to know your dad first. he introduced us to his girls. how has your relationship with your father changed over the years? he came out first, introduced us to you all, now you all are out front and you really see your father. how has the relationship changed over the years as you have moved out front? >> well, he has gone to some money matches and practices, -- he has g
offended by president ahmadinejad's remarks. they were followed by all the european countries, canada, australia, new zealand and a tiny coastal regions as well. some 33 delegations in all left the chamber. these walkouts are not entirely new. they're becoming something of a routine when president ahmadinejad speaks. what annoyed the american so much was this preference to the possibly carrying out the 9/11 attacks themselves. and ahmadinejad referred to israel as the "entity that was saved" as a result. that was the trigger, i think. >> president ahmadinejad's comments have been seen in the local press. why is he bringing this to the international stage now, do you think? >> i think he is pretty consistent. i think he actually believes what he is saying. it may seem strange to many people, certainly, in the western world, but mr. ahmadinejad has used both his speeches here at the un to set out his world view and it is one in stark contrast to those in the western capital. he believes that capitalism is collapsing. he believes that the current world order needs to be swept away, that
silver and gold. it started in canada. this is a big picture play. i think gold is going. if we get a pullback in october in gold, i would buy that. >> tom: in 20 second, you like i.a.u., one of the gold e.t.f.s that hold the precious metal. do you trade it or hold on to it? >> it could be both. what i like, versus the g.l.d., which so many people talk about, which is $120 stock, this mirrors the price of gold and the $12 stock. it is something the average investor can buy, and still buying quality and don't have to commit as much capital. >> tom: how about disclosures for what we mentioned here tonight? >> i own and trade all of them. >> tom: it is mark leibovit, chief market strategist at >> tom: that's "nightly business report" for friday, september 24. i'm tom hudson. goodnight everyone and have a great weekend. you too, susie. >> susie: good night tom. i'm susie gharib have a good weekend everyone. we hope to see all of you again monday night. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)